SESAME GARLIC NOODLES W/ BROCCOLI, BASIL & CRISPY TEMPEH

garlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messgarlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messfor garlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messfor garlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messfor garlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messfor garlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Mess
So, what is our general feeling on Instagram stories? You know, that thing they introduced that’s awfully similar to Snapchat, but slightly simpler, and with a detectable lack of puppy face filter. I tried to get into the groove of using it to document some cooking and food/beverage things in my everyday life, but it felt forced. Snapchat brings up this discomfort for me too. I like sending silly stuff to my friends, but that’s about as far as the enjoyment goes. I guess it’s still a bit new.

When I detect a personal resistance to something, especially if it’s a screen-based entity, I immediately ask myself “What would bring me ease in this situation, and what do I really want?” I like the connection and creativity that “micro-blogging” tools allow, but I also can’t stand things that drain time when I’m not paying attention.

And yet, everyone seems to be stressing the importance of these video/image/communication tools that encapsulate a 24-hour lifecycle. Any time there’s an excessive use of the word “should” floating around, it’s nice to focus on what the most loving and productive way forward would be for others and yourself.

I’m a huge fan of the “If it doesn’t add, it subtracts” idea for most of my career/relationship/life endeavours, and I think these apps are slowly turning into a minus situation. It’s all about creating value for yourself and others, right? You may not be seeing me over on those things too much for the next bit. Cleo pics excluded of course!

Smooth transition: how about some sesame garlic noodles? This one is the perfect trifecta of 1) ready in 25 minutes 2) so, so delicious and easy, and 3) healthy and pretty at the same time. I use tamari, sesame oil, and a few other pantry things as the base for the sauce. Everything can be tossed in the pot that you cook the broccoli/noodles in. Sear some tempeh and done. Easy, right? It’s a chill weeknight dinner that makes totally excellent leftovers. I keep making pistachio dukkah, so I sprinkled some over mine–amazing! Hope you try this one xoxo

for garlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messgarlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messgarlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messgarlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Messgarlic sesame noodles with broccoli, basil & crispy tempeh (#vegan, quick and healthy) - The First Mess
SESAME GARLIC NOODLES W/ BROCCOLI, BASIL & CRISPY TEMPEH RECIPE
Print the recipe here!
from The First Mess // thefirstmess.com
SERVES: 4-6
NOTES: Use any noodles you like for this. I went with a simple spelt-base noodle that I had on hand, but you could also do buckwheat soba, edamame/mung bean fettuccine, brown rice noodles… spiralized raw zucchini even! If you go for traditional cooked/grain-based noodles, just be mindful of the cook time on the package, and drop the broccoli in when there’s about 3 minutes left with the cooking time.

A note on the tempeh too: generally I think tempeh is best when it’s first steamed and then seared/roasted. If you’re open to frying the tempeh in a decent amount of oil (as I describe in this recipe), you can skip the steaming and go straight to browning.

SESAME GARLIC SAUCE INGREDIENTS:
¼ cup gluten-free tamari soy sauce
2 ½ tablespoons maple syrup
2 ½ tablespoons fresh lime juice, plus extra
1 ½ teaspoons toasted sesame oil (I used a hot-toasted one with chilies)
1 clove of garlic, finely grated with a Microplane grater
2 tablespoons sesame seeds, plus extra for garnish

NOODLES ETC:
¾ lb noodles of choice
4 cups small broccoli florets, from roughly 1 bunch of broccoli
2 tablespoons coconut oil
8 oz/227 grams tempeh, sliced ½ inch thick
handful of Thai basil leaves, sliced (or regular basil, no big deal!)
2 green onions, thinly sliced

In a small bowl, whisk together the tamari, maple syrup, lime juice, sesame oil, garlic, and sesame seeds. Set aside.

Fill a large pot with water and bring it to a boil over high heat. Once boiling, add the noodles. Cook the noodles according to package directions, dropping the broccoli florets into the pot when there’s 3 minutes left. Drain the noodles and broccoli.

While the noodles and broccoli are cooking, heat the coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat. Place the tempeh slices in the pan in a single layer. Let the first side brown thoroughly. Flip the slices over and let the other side brown. Season the tempeh with salt and pepper and finish with a squeeze of lime juice.

In a large bowl, toss the noodles, broccoli, tempeh, Thai basil, green onions, and sesame garlic sauce together until everything is evenly mixed. Garnish the sesame garlic noodles with some extra sesame seeds and serve!

Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

subscribe

Email Widget