5-Minute Creamy Nut Milk (perfect for frothing)

Created by Laura Wright
5 from 11 votes
This creamy homemade nut milk is mellow, silky smooth, and perfect for coffee! My preferred nut combo froths like a dream for lattes. It’s also the ideal addition to smoothies, cereal, cooking, and baking.
A head-on shot shows a glass jug being filled with nut milk.

I have worked on this nut milk recipe for so long! I love homemade almond milk as much as the next person (I have a great 2-minute, no soak recipe in my cookbook), but to get that perfect dairy-free latte froth, you need my tried and tested nut combo! This milk is perfect in any of my recipes that call for non-dairy milk. It’s creamy, mellow-tasting, and easy to make.

A 3/4 angle shot shows a bottle of nut milk and a latte topped with cinnamon nearby
An overhead shot shows a trio of nuts that have plumped up from an overnight soaking.
The nuts plump up significantly after an 8 hour soak in water.

Why homemade nut milk?

  • It tastes better. Making your own nut milk from soaked raw nuts and water (plus optional add-ins) produces a clean and fresh-tasting milk.
  • Simple ingredients. If you’re concerned about some of the extras in store bought nut milk, going homemade will absolve those doubts.
  • Cost effective. When compared to premium brands that feature only water and nuts in their milk (Malk, Three Trees & Elmhurst), making your own at home will save you money.
  • Less waste. No cartons to dispose of and you can repurpose that leftover nut pulp in smoothies, creamy puréed soups, or nut pulp granola.
  • Naturally dairy-free and perfect for cooking and baking.

Of course you can “milk” any nut that you like, but for my taste I like equal parts sliced almonds (less pulp than whole almonds), raw cashews, and raw macadamia nuts. The resulting milk produces beautiful microfoam for coffee and has a velvety, slightly sweet richness that works perfectly in my recipes.

Equipment:

  • High speed blender. I have a 10+ year old Vitamix 5200 series blender that gets the job done perfectly.
  • Nut milk bag. Using a nut milk bag gets a super silky-textured milk (better than a fine mesh strainer). It also allows you to squeeze every last drop out.
  • Large bowl that you can comfortably pour from. A batter bowl is great.
  • Glass bottles or jars with lids for storing your finished milk in the fridge.

My homemade nut milk always lasts a week in the fridge–sometimes longer! The only time I’ve had it spoil in a shorter amount of time is because I either soaked the nuts for 10+ hours or I blended the milk to the point of heating it slightly in my blender (longer than a minute). I spell out the steps to avoid this in the recipe.

For frothing and coffee drinks, I use the steam wand on my espresso machine. Breville has a great tutorial for that method here. This milk also makes lovely foam in plug-in frothers, although it is a touch less fine.

An overhead shot shows freshly made nut milk and another bowl with the nut pulp in a nut milk bag.
Leftover nut pulp is excellent blended into smoothies, added to creamy puréed soups, or used in recipes.
A 3/4 angle image shows a bottle of vanilla extract and a small plate with some ground cinnamon and a spoonful of coconut butter.
Optional flavour enhancers such as vanilla, cinnamon, or coconut butter are great in this milk.
A head-on shot shows a glass jug that is 2/3 full with homemade nut milk.

5-Minute Creamy Nut Milk (perfect for frothing)

This creamy homemade nut milk is mellow, silky smooth, and perfect for coffee! My preferred nut combo froths like a dream for lattes. It’s also the ideal addition to smoothies, cereal, dairy-free cooking, and baking.
5 from 11 votes
A head-on shot shows a glass jug being filled with nut milk.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
SOAKING TIME: 8 hours
Servings 5 CUPS

Ingredients

Nut Milk

  • cup sliced almonds
  • cup raw cashews
  • cup raw macadamia nuts
  • 5 cups water, plus extra for soaking

Optional Add-Ins:

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon/other spices
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon coconut butter

Notes

  • Why sliced almonds specifically? Their taste seems mellower to me and there’s less pulp.
  • What I do with nut milk pulp: save it in a container in the fridge so that I can add spoonfuls to smoothies, blend into creamy puréed soups to give them more richness, or make nut pulp granola.
  • Macadamia nuts are spendy and sometimes I want to make this a bit more economical! In those instances I substitute them with hemp seeds, which require zero soaking. Hemp seeds will change the flavour of the milk, veering towards grassy and fresh. They still help with the froth though :)
  • My nut milk always lasts a week in the fridge, sometimes longer! The only time I’ve had it spoil in a shorter amount of time is because I either soaked the nuts 10+ hours or I blended the milk to the point of heating it slightly in my blender (longer than a minute). Add a couple ice cubes to the blender in the initial blend if you’re really worried about this.

Instructions

  • The night before: place your nuts in a large bowl and cover them with water. Let them sit for 8 hours maximum.
  • Drain the nuts and give them a good rinse. Set a large bowl (that you can pour from) and a nut milk bag out on the counter nearby.
  • Add the drained nuts to a high speed blender and cover with 5 cups of water. Blend this mixture on high for 1 full minute, until you have a creamy milk consistency. Avoid going over 1 minute as this heats the milk.
  • Run the nut milk through your nut milk bag over the large bowl. Squeeze out as much liquid as you can. See notes for pulp uses.
  • If you’re adding vanilla or any other add-ins, rinse the blender before pouring the strained milk back into it. Toss your add-ins into the blender and give it a quick 15 second blend to combine.
  • Store your nut milk in a sealed glass bottle/jar. This should keep in the fridge for 1 week.
  • For frothing: I use a steam wand on my espresso machine. Plug-in frothers are great too! I don't recommend taking this milk over 145°F as the higher temperatures impact the texture and flavour.
07/06/2023
Posted in: autumn, basics, beverage, breakfast, cashews, creamy, gluten free, grain-free, oil free, raw, refined sugar-free, spring, summer, sweet, vegan, winter

10 comments

Recipe Rating




  • Sara

    5 stars
    Hi Laura
    Love the taste and the texture when steamed However I think I will use a little less milk next time to make it creamier.
    I am finding that the milk splits in my coffee but I can’t source any liquid sunflower lecithin. Could I use powdered sunflower lecithin instead?

  • Celia

    Looks so good. Have you tried this in English breakfast tea? Does it split?

    • Laura Wright

      Hi Celia,
      I have not tried this simply poured into black tea of any kind unfortunately. I learned this a few years ago, but if you want to avoid homemade nut milk from splitting in hot beverages, just add about a teaspoon of sunflower lecithin liquid when blending. I’ve used this one in the past: https://www.nowfoods.com/products/supplements/sunflower-liquid-lecithin
      -L

  • Anne

    Do you have a alternative to coconut butter?

    • Laura Wright

      You could use a dab of coconut oil or just leave it out!
      -L

  • Alina

    5 stars
    Love this! I think I remember you mentioning on instagram that you add sunflower lecithin to your milk to help keep it from breaking when used as a creamer. Am I remembering that right? If so, how much do you use?

    • Laura Wright

      Hi Alina!
      Yes I still do this sometimes. Sunflower lecithin is a natural emulsifier. You’ll need 1 teaspoon with this batch of nut milk.
      -L

      • Sara

        5 stars
        Hi Laura
        Love the taste and the texture when steamed However I think I will use a little less milk next time to make it creamier.
        I am finding that the milk splits in my coffee but I can’t source any liquid sunflower lecithin. Could I use powdered sunflower lecithin instead?

  • Amy

    Have you ever tried freezing some of the nut milk to use later?

    • Laura Wright

      Hi Amy,
      I have frozen this milk and it wasn’t the same after thawing. Super chunky and honestly a bit off-tasting :(
      -L